Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair!

I chose this cartoon because I found it to be very humorous.  How often to you hear someone comparing the ride up and down from Rapunzel's tower to bungee jumping? 
I think this cartoon relates to both the tale Rapunzel and the Movie Tangled.  The most obvious reason why it relates to the the Grimms' tale is because the man bungee jumping is a prince, not an orphan like Flynn Rider is in Tangled.  However in the tale, we don't exactly hear about anyone swinging or using the hair for anything other than as a way to get up and down from the tower.  In the movie though, Rapunzel uses her hair for a lot.  There are several scenes where she uses it to tie someone up, to get from place to place in her tower, and at one point she is swinging around a tree on it like it were a swing and it was no big deal.  If she can heal Flynn's hand with her hair as well as use it every day to lift people up to her tower, I am almost positive bungee jumping with it would not be a problem either. 

Sunday, November 11, 2012

The Three Versions of "Bluebeard"

"The Robber Bridegroom" and "Fitcher's Bird," are two stories written by the Brothers Grimm.  Both stories share similarities and differences in their story lines to that of Perrault's "Bluebeard." 

In all three stories, the main character is male.  In the "Robber Bridegroom," the man is a robber who was perceived to be the right suitor for the millers daughter.  In the Fitcher's Bird, the man is a sorcerer. 
And finally in "Bluebeard," the man is a very ugly man with a blue beard.  All three men are murderers as well.

In all three stories the men lure in girls and not one of them returns.  It is not until he finds the wife that is told of specifically in the story that the women's fate begins to turn around.

In the stories, "Bluebeard" and "Fitcher's Bird," both men leave the house for a period of time.  They tell their wives they can explore their houses, invite others over, and have fun, as long as they do not enter one specific room.  In both stories the wife enters this room and is caught due to blood on the object the must keep safe or not use.  In "Bluebeard" his wife is not actually killed.  She is saved by her brothers.  But in the story "Fitcher's Bird," the first wife is killed, and her sister is then married to the sorcerer.  The second sister is also killed for being curious and looking into the forbidden room.  And finally their other sister gets married to this man, however she is able to out smart him and bring her sisters back to life.   
The story of "The Robber Bridegroom," is not as similar to "Bluebeard" as "Fitcher's Bird" is.  In this story, the millers daughter is forced to marry the robber.  It is unknown however that this man is indeed a robber until she is invited to his house.  There she discovers that he is a murder with several other men.  When she escapes from his house and returns home, she explains this to her father.  She is asked at the wedding party later to tell a story, where she tells the story of the murder and presents proof.

I really like the story "The Robber Bridegroom."  It is an interesting story.  I especially like the ending when the bride-to-be tells the story of the robber Bridegroom and she pulls out the finger as proof.  I did not expect that, and i really enjoyed it.

However, the story I did not like was the "Fitcher's Wife."  I found it to be extremely odd.   I did not like the fact that two of the three sisters were killed after falling for the same man.  It was not as interesting as "The Robber Bridegroom" in my opinion.